Pet Safety

May 7, 2013

A pet is a member of the family, and as a member of the family you might just want to bring them along on family trips and vacations. While many dog and cat owners regularly have their pets accompany them on short jaunts and long excursions, traveling with your pet is an aspect of pet ownership that involves a whole new set of rules to ensure that your pet will remain comfortable and safe. These are a few rules of pet safety when it comes to having your dog and cat as a travel companion.

  • When it comes to travel, whether or not your pet is involved, it is crucial to make sure that you bring absolutely everything that you need. This includes everything that your pet needs, including toys, treats, food, medication, crates, and license when applicable. Also bring plenty of water that you know is good and safe; your pet’s system may not be accustomed to the tap water where you will be traveling.
  • If your pet is traveling in a crate, make sure that the crate is sufficiently well-ventilated. This is particularly important for long trips.
  • Get your pet checked at the vet shortly before leaving to insure that they will be okay with traveling and there are no issues that need to be addressed.
  • Check that your accommodations will allow your pet before booking.
  • Make stops to feed your pet; do not feed them in a moving car.
  • Whether you are bringing you pet an epic cross-country trip or just a drive to the store, never under any circumstances leave your pet in a parked vehicle.

These are just a few of the most important pet safety tips when traveling.

If you have decided it is time to add a four-legged or feathered family member to your home, there is a lot to consider. After all, there are a lot of choices in pets with a variety of amount of care needed.

Perhaps the easiest pet to care for is a fish, or a few fish. Although they do not need a lot of attention, they do need daily care. At a minimum, the bowl or aquarium must be kept clean and at the proper temperature for the species you choose and they need daily feeding.

Whether choosing a pet for yourself or for the family with a child in charge of its care, it is important that an adult be able to oversee the care and make sure that your he or she has food, water, and is cleaned up after. Maybe you will choose a hamster to be kept in the kid’s room. That is great, but make sure that your child is giving your new pet fresh food and water daily as well as a clean living area.

Dogs and cats are the most popular choices in pets. Adopting from a shelter or a rescue agency is a wonderful way to add to the family while rescuing a life. But, make sure you are ready for the responsibility of this new family member. It is a long-term, important commitment that should not be taken lightly. Cats and dogs can live 15 to 20 years. They not only need proper daily care, but also companionship and attention. Shelters are full of these former pets of those who have not taken their responsibilities seriously.

It is not necessary for pets to breed. In fact, they are happier and healthier just being pets. For dogs and cats, it is best to neuter or spay. For smaller pets such as hamsters, guinea pigs and rabbits, one can be kept alone or you can get two of the same sex for their like companionship.

Before obtaining any new pets, research what will fit into your family and lifestyle best. Consider whether you may have any allergies that could be triggered by a new pet. Think about how much time you have to spend and just what you expect from a new pet. Pick wisely, and prepare to have your life enriched by your new family member.

If you have decided it is time to add a four-legged or feathered family member to your home, there is a lot to consider. After all, there are a lot of choices in pets with a variety of amount of care needed.

Perhaps the easiest pet to care for is a fish, or a few fish. Although they do not need a lot of attention, they do need daily care. At a minimum, the bowl or aquarium must be kept clean and at the proper temperature for the species you choose and they need daily feeding.

Whether choosing a pet for yourself or for the family with a child in charge of its care, it is important that an adult be able to oversee the care and make sure that he or she has food, water, and is cleaned up after. Maybe you will choose a hamster to be kept in the kid’s room. That is great, but make sure that your child is giving your new pet fresh food and water daily as well as a clean living area.

Dogs and cats are the most popular choices in pets. Adopting from a shelter or a rescue agency is a wonderful way to add to the family while rescuing a life. But, make sure you are ready for the responsibility of this new family member. It is a long-term, important commitment that should not be taken lightly. Cats and dogs can live 15 to 20 years. They not only need proper daily care, but also companionship and attention. Shelters are full of these former pets of those who have not taken their responsibilities seriously.

It is not necessary for pets to breed. In fact, they are happier and healthier just being pets. For dogs and cats, it is best to neuter or spay. For smaller pets such as hamsters, guinea pigs and rabbits, one can be kept alone or you can get two of the same sex for their like companionship.

Before obtaining any new pets, research what will fit into your family and lifestyle best. Consider whether you may have any allergies that could be triggered by a new pet. Think about how much time you have to spend and just what you expect from a new pet. Pick wisely, and prepare to have your life enriched by your new family member.

A pet is a member of the family, and as a member of the family you might just want to bring them along on family trips and vacations. While many dog and cat owners regularly have their pets accompany them on short jaunts and long excursions, traveling with your pet is an aspect of pet ownership that involves a whole new set of rules to ensure that your pet will remain comfortable and safe. These are a few rules of pet safety when it comes to having your dog and cat as a travel companion.

  • When it comes to travel, whether or not your pet is involved, it is crucial to make sure that you bring absolutely everything that you need. This includes everything that your pet needs, including toys, treats, food, medication, crates, and license when applicable. Also bring plenty of water that you know is good and safe; your pet’s system may not be accustomed to the tap water where you will be travelling.
  • If your pet is travelling in a crate, make sure that the crate is sufficiently well-ventilated. This is particularly important for long trips.
  • Get your pet checked at the vet shortly before leaving to insure that they will be okay with traveling and there are no issues that need to be addressed.
  • Check that your accommodations will allow your pet before booking.
  • Make stops to feed your pet, do not feed them in a moving car.
  • Whether you are bringing you pet an epic cross-country trip or just a drive to the store, never under any circumstances leave your pet in a parked vehicle.

These are just a few of the most important pet safety tips when travelling.

When it comes to getting a dog, most people choose to buy a puppy. And who can blame them? There are few things in this world more endearing than a playful puppy. Yet unfortunately, this leaves a lot of animal shelter dogs in one of two positions: a lifetime of living in a shelter – or an early death.

So there’s your first reason why you should adopt a dog instead of getting a puppy – you may well be saving an innocent life.

But what other benefits are there to adopting a dog over buying a puppy?

It’s easier to ascertain the personality of an adult dog:

Although in most cases when you spend a little bit of time with a puppy you should be able to gain an idea of its personality, with most animal shelter dogs what you see is what you get. If you want to be certain of how an adult dog will fit into your family, you will generally be best off adopting a dog from a shelter.

Animal shelter dogs are usually house-trained:

And most people would agree that house training a puppy is one of the biggest downfalls to joining the world of puppy parenthood. Not to mention the fact that…

Puppies love to chew things:

Sofas, cabinets, cables – they’re not picky – when puppies are teething they will chew anything and everything they can get their teeth around. While there is no guarantee an adult dog will have this habit, a love of chewing is far less common in fully grown dogs, and in most cases the staff at the animal shelter will be able to tell you whether or not a particular dog seems to have a penchant for chewing.